Thanh-ha

Robbie Williams calls in healer to drive out spirit of Michael Winner

first_imgThe late Michael Winner outside his houseCredit:Mike Lawn/REX/Shutterstock The late Michael Winner outside his house Robbie Williams has enlisted a Native American healer to cleanse his new £17.5 million mansion of the spirit of its former owner, the film maker Michael Winner.The rock star and his wife Ayda Field made the bizarre plan after moving into the Grade II-listed Woodland House in west London.TV presenter Ayda, 37, revealed she is spooked by the thought of the late Death Wish director “watching over her” and criticising her interior decor for the Victorian mansion. She told ITV’s Loose Women the couple have enlisted a Native American healer to burn herbs in order to cleanse the house of Winner’s stubborn spirit.She said: “I am kind of concerned because I’m like, ‘Michael, do you like this? Is this OK with you?'”He was such a larger-than-life character.”Ayda plans to have the house saged: a Native American ritual where bundles of dried sage are burned to cleanse a space of negative energies.”I am going to have it blessed, saged, the whole LA thing,” she said.Winner died in the house at the age of 77 in January 2013. Williams bought it in December that year.But a friend of Winner’s, Barry McKay, is appalled at the idea.”Isn’t that all a bit New Age faddish?” he told the Daily Mail. “Michael would consider this all bonkers, especially having his spirit expunged.”He once said he hoped to exert a presence at Woodland House from the afterlife…and so he should.” Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

Nigeria attacks Blasts and rockets kill 31 in Borno state

Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)RelatedNigeria suicide blast kills 30 football fans in BornoJune 17, 2019In “latest news”Nigeria army releases 183 detained childrenJuly 9, 2018In “latest news”UN: World facing greatest humanitarian crisis since 1945March 11, 2017In “World” Blasts and rockets ‘kill 31’ in Borno stateTwo suicide bombers have attacked a town in north-eastern Nigeria only hours after the country’s army chief urged displaced residents to return home because it was safe.The blasts hit the town of Damboa in Borno state on Saturday evening and residents say at least 31 people died. The explosions were followed up by rockets fired from outside the town.Boko Haram militants are suspected. Army chief Lt Gen Tukur Buratai had said they were no longer a threat. A four-month military operation started on 1 May to expel Boko Haram insurgents from northern Borno and the Lake Chad region.No group has said it carried out Saturday evening’s attacks but a militia leader speaking to AFP, Babakura Kolo, said they bore the hallmarks of Boko Haram, a jihadist group that wants to establish a caliphate in northern Nigeria.Officials said at least 20 people died in the attacks but residents said they had counted the dead and an anonymous local official confirmed the toll.“It has destroyed our houses. We have also counted 31 innocent people including children and elderly killed in the attack,” local resident Modu Usman, son of a community leader, told Reuters news agency.AttackMore than 40 people were injured in the attacks, which were aimed at people celebrating the Eid al-Fitr holiday in the Shuwari and Abachari districts of the town.The rocket attacks appear to have caused most of the casualties, a local official said.The UN says 1.7 million people have been forced from their homes due to the Boko Haram conflict, which is now in its ninth year.Boko Haram uses suicide bombers, often young girls, to target civilians and soldiers.In one of the most recent attacks, bombers killed dozens of people in and around a mosque in the town of Mubi.Despite the ongoing threat of suicide bombings, the security situation in north-east Nigeria has improved, says BBC Africa Editor Will Ross.But there will be some scepticism about calls to return home, our correspondent adds. Previous promises that it is safe because the jihadists have been defeated have proved to be premature. (BBC) read more