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Tennis News US Open 2019: Rafael Nadal Beats Diego Schwartzman, To Meet Marco Berrettini In Semifinal

first_img New Delhi: Rafael Nadal remains on course for his 19th Grand Slam title after a hard-fought quarterfinal win over Diego Schwartzman in the US Open on Thursday. Nadal beat Schwartzman 6-4, 7-5, 6-2 to advance to the semifinals. He now stands two wins from year’s second Grand Slam title, which would place him one shy of Roger Federer’s all-time mark of 20. Nadal (33) will next play Italy’s 24th seed Marco Berrettini, who beat Gael Monfils in their last eight clash. Nadal, who won his 18th Grand Slam with a 12th title at Roland Garros in June, is the favourite to win the title with both Novak Djokovic and Roger Federer already out of the picture. Apart from than Nadal, all the other semifinalists – Berrettini, Grigor Dimitrov and Daniil Medvedev – have never played in a Grand Slam final. The past 11 Grand Slams have all been won by either Nadal, 32-year-old Djokovic or 38-year-old Federer.Nadal was made to work as Schwartzman twice rallied from four-game deficits in a stuffy Arthur Ashe stadium. Nadal raced ahead 4-0 for a great start before the Schwartzman hit back winings four straight games. Nadal came back to take the next two game and clinch the opening set. The same pattern continued in the second set with Nadal moving a double break up before Schwartzman fought back from 5-1 to level at 5-5. Nadal showed his experience at the crucial moment breaking Schwartzman in the 12th game with his third set point.In the final set, Nadal wrapped things up quickly, breaking twice without reply to clinch victory in two hours and 46 minutes.Matteo Berrettini wins thriller against Gael MonfilsEarlier, Matteo Berrettini became the first Italian man to reach the US Open semifinals in 42 years on Wednesday to set up a potential showdown with Nadal.Berrettini, the 24th seed, matched Corrado Barazzutti’s run to the last four in 1977 after outlasting 13th-seeded Frenchman Gael Monfils 3-6, 6-3, 6-2, 3-6, 7-6 (7/5) in three hours and 57 minutes.Berrettini joined Barazzutti, 1976 Roland Garros champion Adriano Panatta and Marco Cecchinato as just the fourth Italian to advance to a men’s Grand Slam semi-final in singles.”What a great fight. I think it was one of the best matches I maybe ever saw — I was playing but I also saw. I’m really happy I don’t know what to say,” Berrettini said.The first-time Slam quarter-finalist blew a 5-2 lead in the final set and four match points before finally seeing off Monfils in a thriller at Arthur Ashe Stadium.”I was lucky I had match points and he didn’t have it – it’s better when you have them. I’m really proud of myself, I was always focusing on the next point.”A nervous Berrettini doubled-faulted on his first match point at 5-3 before a resolute Monfils fought off two more on his serve to send the deciding set into a tie-break.Monfils coughed up a costly pair of double faults in the breaker – and 17 in total – as Berrettini surged 5-2 ahead, the Frenchman rescuing a fourth match point before a booming serve from the Italian clinched a memorable win.”Right now I don’t remember any points, just the match point. I remember also my double fault I must be honest,” Berrettini said. Rafael Nadal has won the US Open in 2010, 2013 and 2017Nadal is the only member of the “Big Three” still standing in New York Novak Djokovic and Roger Federer have already exited the tournament  For all the Latest Sports News News, Tennis News News, Download News Nation Android and iOS Mobile Apps.center_img highlightslast_img read more

Column: NBA still must deal with the race issue

first_imgIn this Jan. 8, 2014, file photo, then-Cleveland Cavaliers forward Luol Deng talks with reporters after practice in Independence, Ohio. Atlanta Hawks general manager Danny Ferry has been disciplined by CEO Steve Koonin for making racially charged comments about Luol Deng when the team pursued the free agent this year. (AP Photo/Mark Duncan, File)ATLANTA (AP) — While the NFL was rightfully being hammered over turning a blind eye to domestic violence, the NBA got a bit of a pass on its latest brouhaha.No longer.Training camps are starting up around the NBA, so it’s time to ask a blunt question: Does the league celebrated for its diversity and inclusiveness actually have a race problem?Any thought that Donald Sterling was just an isolated case of bigotry was quickly erased by a nasty situation in Atlanta, where racially charged comments made by both a co-owner and the general manager have left the Hawks mired in turmoil.On Friday, team officials met with civil rights leaders at Philips Arena, while Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed was in New York to huddle with NBA Commissioner Adam Silver over the future of the Hawks.Silver, who acted so decisively in running Sterling out of the league after the Los Angeles Clippers vile owner was recorded telling his girlfriend he didn’t want Blacks at his games, faces a more complex predicament when it comes to the Hawks.This could be an even bigger test for the rookie commissioner, who has faced some mighty big challenges since taking over for David Stern in February.There’s no easy escape plan for the Atlanta problem, no Steve Ballmer waiting in the wings to pay whatever it takes to purchase the franchise of a disgraced owner. In this case, Bruce Levenson, who agreed to sell his share of the Hawks after the revelation of a 2-year-old email in which he complained about the fan base having too many African-Americans and not enough Whites.Also, what to do with general manager Danny Ferry? He remains on a leave of absence after casually tossing around horrific racial stereotypes while discussing the pros and cons of signing free agent Luol Deng.The NBA caught a break in this whole mess, the headlines dominated in recent weeks by Ray Rice and the NFL’s domestic abuse scandal. But the Hawks case should be at least as alarming to the NBA as Sterling’s racist blathering in a private setting, caught by a scheming girlfriend and her recorder.Levenson put his feelings in writing and sent them to Ferry and the other team owners (none of whom, it must be noted, were offended enough to do anything about it in 2012). Ferry was on a recorded conference call with the ownership group when, as the story goes, he read from a scouting report that said Deng has “some African in him” and went on with some nonsense comparing him to a store that looks legitimate out front but sells counterfeit goods in the back.“It is troubling that it could happen in the workplace,” said Richard Lapchick, founder of The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sports at the University of Central Florida. “I think teams really need to adopt a zero-tolerance policy for anything that would smack of racism or sexism or homophobia.”Going by the example he set in the Sterling case, Silver would have already made it clear that someone like Ferry has no place in the NBA, or at least deserve some serious time on the sidelines.Instead, it looks like the wheels are in motion for Ferry to return at some point this season.Early on, Silver said he didn’t think the GM deserved to lose his job. This week, Hall of Famer Magic Johnson met privately with Ferry and changed his previous stance that a firing was in order. Even Deng, who signed with the Miami Heat, said Friday that he has forgiven Ferry and doesn’t think he’s a racist.But before we all give him a pass, the commissioner needs to address some very real issues, such as:— When the Hawks and the NBA announced that Levenson was selling his share of the team, why didn’t they bother to say the whole thing came to light because of an internal investigation into Ferry’s comments this past summer?— If Ferry was merely repeating someone else’s assessment of Deng, who wrote the offensive scouting report?— Why would Ferry feel comfortable enough to repeat those comments in such an official setting, even if they weren’t his own?— Does it even matter if Ferry was reading someone else’s words? Aren’t all stereotypes passed along in one way or another? Would Sterling have deserved a break if he had claimed he was merely repeating views he heard as a child?Lapchick, whose annual reports on racial and gender equality have always given the NBA the highest marks of any professional league, said he’s confident Silver will do the right thing.“If this happened in any other league, I would be more concerned,” Lapchick said Friday in a telephone interview. “But because it’s the NBA, with its record across the board in hiring practices and progressive policies and getting teams working in the communities … all that is a counterweight.”Fair enough.But Silver must act, thoroughly and completely, before clearing the way for Ferry’s return — or, if called for, firmly instruct the Hawks to go in a different direction.Even more than giving Sterling the heave-ho, that might be the best way for Silver to really prove racism has no place in his game.___Paul Newberry is a national writer for The Associated Press. Write to him at [email protected] or at www.twitter.com/pnewberry1963last_img read more