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first_imgNews | February 18, 2015 Radioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck Tumors Holmium beads offer pinpoint radiation dispersal, can be monitored through multiple modalities Related Content Feature | August 05, 2019 | Dave Fornell, Editor Most Popular Radiology and Radiotherapy Topics in July 2019 August 5, 2019 — Here is the list of the most popular content on the Imaging Technology New (ITN) magazine website fr read more News | Radiation Therapy | August 16, 2019 Drug Accelerates Blood System’s Recovery After Radiation, Chemotherapy A drug developed by UCLA physician-scientists and chemists speeds up the regeneration of mouse and human blood stem… read more News | Radiation Therapy | August 02, 2019 Varian Showcases Cancer Care Systems and Software at AAPM 2019 Varian showcased systems and software from its cancer care portfolio, including the Identify Guidance System, at the… read more News | Proton Therapy | August 08, 2019 MD Anderson to Expand Proton Therapy Center The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center unveiled plans to expand its Proton Therapy Center during a… read more News | Patient Positioning Radiation Therapy | August 15, 2019 Mevion and C-RAD Release Integration for Improved Proton Therapy Treatment Quality Mevion Medical Systems and C-RAD announced the integration between the C-RAD Catalyst PT and the Mevion S250i proton… read more February 18, 2015 — Researchers at University Medical Center (UMC) Utrecht are developing an innovative cancer treatment involving the injection of radioactive beads into tumors, thereby enabling a very precise localized radiotherapy. The treatment is being developed with the help of a grant from Alpe d’HuZes/Dutch Cancer Society (KWF) of nearly 300,000 euros.Direct injection of radioactive beads may be an effective treatment of tumors that are difficult or impossible to remove surgically. This is the basic principle of medical biologist Frank Nijsen, M.D., dental surgeon Robert van Es, M.D., and nuclear physician Marnix Lam, M.D., of UMC Utrecht. They are working together with Bas van Nimwegen, M.D., of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine of Utrecht University to treat head and neck tumors with radioactive beads. The treatment involves holmium microspheres that appear on a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or a nuclear scan. Using image-guided injection, the microspheres can be inserted into a tumor in a highly precise and localized fashion. In the first three millimeters, the holmium microspheres emit 90 percent of their radiation. The treatment is radically different from similar approaches involving radioactive yttrium microspheres. Holmium microspheres can be located using MRI, computed tomography (CT) and nuclear imaging techniques. This enables improved monitoring of the holmium treatment’s safety and effectiveness.In collaboration with the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine of Utrecht University the treatment is now being tested in pets with tumors. The preliminary results are positive. Over the past four years, 15 cats and dogs have been treated for predominantly aggressive tongue tumors. The treatment was effective in the majority of animals. On average, tumor size was reduced by 80 percent and the tongue could still be used.“The results in these animal patients are very promising,” said Ron Koole, M.D., of the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery of UMC Utrecht. “That is why I brought together scientists working on this subject to make the treatment available to human cancer patients as well.” The grant from Alpe d’HuZes/KWF will be used by the Utrecht researchers to expand their activities in this field. This should result in a phase I clinical trial studying the safety of the treatment in cancer patients. One of the most important questions is how these microspheres should be injected in order for them to effectively spread within the tumor and produce maximum effect. Possible side effects of the treatment should also be identified.“Head and neck tumors are of course only one application of this treatment,” says Frank Nijsen, M.D., of UMC Utrecht. “In principle, it is possible to treat any fixed tumor that can be reached with a needle with holmium microspheres. However, we first need to prove that we can inject tumors repeatedly and in a controlled manner.”For more information: www.umcutrecht.nl FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 News | Brachytherapy Systems | August 14, 2019 Efficacy of Isoray’s Cesium Blu Showcased in Recent Studies August 14, 2019 — Isoray announced a trio of studies recently reported at scientific meetings and published in medica read more News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers | August 02, 2019 ASRT Supports Radiopharmaceutical Reimbursement Bill The American Society of Radiologic Technologists (ASRT) announced its support for House Resolution (HR) 3772, a measure… read more Following radiation, the bone marrow shows nearly complete loss of blood cells in mice (left). Mice treated with the PTP-sigma inhibitor displayed rapid recovery of blood cells (purple, right). Credit: UCLA Broad Stem Cell Research Center/Nature Communications News | Radiation Therapy | August 15, 2019 First Patient Enrolled in World’s Largest Brain Cancer Clinical Trial Henry Ford Cancer Institute is first-in-the-world to enroll a glioblastoma patient in the GBM AGILE Trial (Adaptive… read more The MD Anderson Proton Therapy Center expansion is expected to be completed in 2023. Rendering courtesy of Stantec. Catalyst PT image courtesy of C-RAD The top piece of content in July was a video interview explaining how Princess Margaret Cancer Center is using machine learning to create automated treatment plans. This was a hot topic at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting in July.  News | Proton Therapy | August 06, 2019 IBA Signs Contract to Install Proton Therapy Center in Kansas IBA (Ion Beam Applications S.A.) recently signed a contract and received the first payment for a Proteus One solution… read more News | Patient Positioning Radiation Therapy | August 07, 2019 Qfix kVue One Proton Couch Top Validated by Mevion Medical Systems Qfix and Mevion Medical Systems announced that a special version of the kVue One Proton couch top is now both validated… read more last_img

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