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Federal Budget 2012-2014 Provides About USD34 Million For Sevmash Shipyard

first_img View post tag: News by topic Back to overview,Home naval-today Federal Budget 2012-2014 Provides About USD34 Million For Sevmash Shipyard Industry news Federal Budget 2012-2014 Provides About USD34 Million For Sevmash Shipyard View post tag: FEDERAL View post tag: For View post tag: about View post tag: budget View post tag: Navy October 7, 2011 View post tag: 2012-2014 View post tag: shipyard It is planned to appropriate RUR 1.1 bln of federal budget resources to support JSC Sevmash Shipyard (Severodvinsk, Arkhangelsk region) in 2012-2014. That is provided by draft budget submitted for parliamentary consideration.In particular, budget 2012 implies over RUR 263 mln as payment of interests on credits granted by Vneshekonombank.Besides, it is planned to appropriate RUR 282.23 mln in 2012 for re-equipment and modernization of the shipyard, RUR 306.15 mln in 2013, and RUR 252.3 mln in 2014.Sevmash shipyard was established in 1936. Since 1939 the yard has built 45 surface ships and 163 submarines including 128 nuclear-powered ones. Since 1990 Sevmash has built over 100 various civil vessels for foreign customers (tugs, minibulkers, pontoons, fish-breeding plants). The shipyard puts high priority on Arctic oil-and-gas field development projects.[mappress]Source: rusnavy, October 07, 2011 View post tag: USD34 View post tag: million View post tag: provides View post tag: Naval View post tag: Sevmash Share this articlelast_img read more

Royal Navy escorts Russian destroyer through English Channel

first_img November 21, 2017 View post tag: Royal Navy View post tag: HMS Somerset Royal Navy frigate HMS Somerset scrambled recently to shadow a Russian naval destroyer as it transited the Moray Firth, returning home from the Mediterranean Sea.It was not the Kulakov’s first visit to UK waters as the destroyer was also shadowed by HMS Somerset from the same position in the Moray Firth in March 2016.The Russian Northern Fleet was conducting a long voyage mission in the Mediterranean Sea, visiting ports in Cyprus, Egypt and Oman.Somerset, a Plymouth-based Type 23 frigate, detected and monitored the movements of the Russian warship Vice Admiral Kulakov and her supporting tanker.HMS Somerset had been engaged in trials of her sonar equipment when she received the call to locate and shadow the Russian units.She arrived in the Moray Firth on Saturday (18 November) and escorted the ships through UK waters and north along the coast of Norway before returning to her original task.Commander Timothy Berry, HMS Somerset’s Commanding Officer, said: “As with all Royal Navy ships operating in UK waters, HMS Somerset was at a high state of alert to deal with any maritime security task such as this.“Monitoring transits of non-NATO warships through UK territorial waters is part of what the Royal Navy does all year round to keep Britain safe.“We now continue with our original tasking having seen the Russian ships safely through the UK’s area of interest.” Authorities Royal Navy escorts Russian destroyer Vice Admiral Kulakov through English Channelcenter_img Share this article Back to overview,Home naval-today Royal Navy escorts Russian destroyer Vice Admiral Kulakov through English Channel View post tag: Vice Admiral Kulakov View post tag: Russian Navylast_img read more

Press release: New funding for suicide prevention in England

first_img Public Health England exists to protect and improve the nation’s health and wellbeing, and reduce health inequalities. We do this through world-leading science, knowledge and intelligence, advocacy, partnerships and providing specialist public health services. We are an executive agency of the Department of Health and Social Care, and a distinct organisation with operational autonomy. We provide government, local government, the NHS, Parliament, industry and the public with evidence-based professional, scientific expertise and support. Follow us on Twitter: @PHE_uk and Facebook: www.facebook.com/PublicHealthEngland. The £25 million investment over 3 years is in addition to significant investment in mental health as part of the NHS Five Year Forward View for mental health to deliver accessible high-quality care. This includes expansion in crisis care for all ages, children and young people’s services and services for pregnant women and new mothers which should also support a reduction in suicides.Background Duncan Selbie, Chief Executive at Public Health England, said: Reported road casualties in Great Britain: 2016 annual report. Claire Murdoch, NHS England Director for Mental Health, said: Every single suicide is a tragedy – which is why this funding is so vital. Working with the Samaritans and others in high risk areas, we will make sure people get the care they need as early as possible, because that is what saves lives. All local areas are developing suicide prevention plans and this work will support our ‘zero suicide’ ambition in mental health inpatient units. Working closely with those who have been impacted by suicide and those with national expertise, including the Samaritans, the areas to receive funding this year have been identified due to their high level of need and will focus on particularly at-risk groups such as men and those who self-harm.The areas set to receive funding are: Suicide is an urgent and complex issue with 3 times more people dying by suicide than in road accidents. We welcome these measures as an important first step, targeting those who are most at risk of taking their own life. We will continue to work with the government to help ensure its funding supports multi-agency working to achieve strong prevention measures in all local areas in order to reduce deaths by suicide. Ruth Sutherland, Samaritans Chief Executive Officer, said: Suicide destroys lives and is devastating for the loved ones they leave behind. We need to do everything we can to offer more help to people in distress and this is a big step towards that. The NHS is committed to improving mental health services and increasing people’s access to help, when they need it the most. Working closely with families, councils, government and charities like the Samaritans, the additional funding and suicide prevention plans confirmed today will mean more people in crisis, in some of the most under-served parts of the country, will be able to get the crucial support they need. The investment announced today by the Department for Health and Social Care, Public Health England (PHE) and NHS England marks the start of a 3-year programme worth £25 million that will reach the whole country by 2021.It forms part of the government’s commitment to reduce suicides in England by 10% by 2021 and will support the zero suicide ambition for mental health inpatients announced by Secretary of State Jeremy Hunt in January of this year.Currently one person every 90 minutes dies by suicide in the UK and approximately two thirds of these are not in contact with mental health services.The funding, which has been allocated to 8 sustainability and transformation partnerships (STPs) with a high level of need, will help to ensure people know high-quality confidential help is available within their community. It will include targeted prevention campaigns for men; psychological support for people with financial difficulties; better care after discharge; and improved self-harm services for all ages.The funds are set to improve suicide prevention strategies, signposting and raising awareness through to improving quality for safer services and will help drive better surveillance and collection of data on suicide, attempted suicide and self-harm.It builds upon major work from all local authorities to put multi-agency suicide plans in place, and work for a close join up between health services, public health teams and the voluntary sector.Jackie Doyle-Price, Minister for Mental Health, said: Kent and Medway Lancashire and South Cumbria Norfolk and Waveney South Yorkshire and Bassetlaw Bristol, North Somerset and South Gloucestershire Cornwall and Isles of Scilly Coventry and Warwickshire Durham, Darlington, Teesside, Hambleton, Richmondshire and Whitby Please remember if you are reporting on suicides to follow the Samaritans media guidelines to help prevent copycat suicides from occurring. Suicides in the UK: 2016 registrations provides data on registered deaths in the UK from suicide analysed by sex, age, area of usual residence of the deceased and suicide method.last_img read more

Tedeschi Trucks Band Shares New Video For ‘Anyhow’

first_imgTedeschi Trucks Band has been in full celebration mode since the release of their most recent album, Let Me Get By (read our review here). Today, they’ve shared a new video for the inspiring track “Anyhow,” filmed from their recording session at Swamp Raga Studios, a birthplace to many of the band’s greatest hits.Watch what it’s like for a band of 12 incredible musicians to play timeless music, via CMT Music:last_img

Provost convenes task force to address students’ psychological well-being

first_imgThis semester, the Office of the Provost convened a task force on managing student mental health to begin to assess and respond to significant increases in both student self-reports of mental health issues and the subsequent use of related services — an uptick that reflects a national trend in higher education over the past several years. The task force is charged with examining how Harvard can best address the mix of academic, social, and institutional issues that have the potential to influence student mental health, while looking beyond traditional services toward a more holistic model of care.The Gazette sat down with the task force’s three chairs, Grafstein Family Professor of Sociology Mario Small, McLean Professor of Ancient and Modern History and of the Classics and Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (GSAS) Emma Dench, and Edgar Pierce Professor of Psychology Matt Nock, to discuss what they hope to bring to the table in their respective leadership roles and how they believe the task force can quickly begin to improve mental health services at Harvard while also planning for long-term change.Q&AMario Small, Emma Dench, and Matt NockGAZETTE: Thank you all for taking the time to sit down with us today to discuss this exciting new initiative from the Office of the Provost. Each of you has a unique background to bring to your leadership role on the task force. Talk about what it means to you to be involved, and what you hope to be able to impart.SMALL: When I was asked by the provost to join and chair this task force, I was very happy to participate for a number of reasons. For one, the work corresponds with my intellectual interests: I recently wrote a book, “Someone To Talk To,” which engages my field of sociology, to try to understand how people make decisions, specifically about whom they turn to when facing difficulties. The book is a combination case study and survey-based study, and I focused the qualitative section of the study on graduate students because of all the difficulties related to the fact they’re entering into a new environment and may also be facing serious life choices at the same time.Most importantly, however, I’m hopeful that I can help to contribute to the quality of life at the University. It’s clear to me that universities in general, and this one in particular, are high-stress environments that attract people who are high-achieving and who often have become so at great personal sacrifice — often emotional or psychosocial in nature. This very ambitious task force, with dozens of people from across the entire University, has the opportunity to do something important and lasting to improve mental health on campus.NOCK: I’m extremely excited about being involved in the task force, in large part because as a clinical psychologist who studies mental health and suicide, I know very well how serious this problem is. We know that mental health disorders often have an onset during the college years. Suicide, which is my primary area of study, is the second-leading cause of death among college students.We’ve known as a society for decades that late adolescence/early adulthood is a time of high onset of mental disorders and suicidal behavior and alcohol and drug abuse. As higher education administrators, we have a captive audience. We have undergraduate students in the same place for four years with the same address and email; we have attachment and the opportunity to provide consistent, strong, coordinated support. The fact that Harvard is now making it a priority to figure out how we can best provide this support, across the University’s Schools and units, is very exciting.DENCH: I’m really pleased to be a member of the task force steering group, and to be leading the working group on graduate and professional students, particularly as those enrolled at the GSAS make up a third of all students in this category. Our students are unique at the University in that it can take five years or more for them to earn their degrees; for some, it can be very challenging along the way. Over the past several years, we’ve partnered with Harvard University Health Services (HUHS) to conduct mental health surveys in a variety of programs, and thanks to very good response rates, we’re learning quite a bit about the scope of mental health problems throughout our student body. I know that the information-gathering we’ve already done will be crucial to the work of the task force.Harvard, on the whole, is very atomized, so I’m really delighted that the task force is concentrating on mental health from a University-wide perspective. I’m hopeful that we can use what we’ve learned at GSAS to help with the development of a broad strategy, one that can effectively support all students at a time when requests for care are increasing. I know it can often be difficult to get together and share what we know with colleagues across Harvard; now we can build a collective process to address that.GAZETTE: There is a real heterogeneity of voices on this task force, which is also quite large. How do you begin to think about incorporating the numerous and diverse perspectives of the task force’s membership, toward actually implementing real University-wide change?DENCH: Harvard is a really complicated place, but our diversity is one of our greatest strengths. I’m a huge fan of getting everybody with different perspectives, experiences, and viewpoints around the same table. That always leads to something better, and I can already tell that we’re going to learn a great deal from one another. When I’ve been involved in similar groups in the past, I’ve noticed how we all realize that we’re each developing and implementing great ideas already, but that we don’t necessarily realize what others are doing. The task force will allow us to share our best practices and quickly provide opportunities to communicate them to our colleagues across Harvard.We are also benefiting from the incredible work undertaken by the Harvard University Review Committee under Annette Gordon-Reed’s leadership. Their recommendations on student mental health inform our work as task force members and highlight the questions we’ve been asking at GSAS, particularly surrounding student challenges that are unique to specific populations. Asking questions, sharing solutions, and hearing where our students’ experiences diverge and intersect will help inform change for the benefit of all Harvard students.NOCK: The diversity and heterogeneity of the committee is necessary and important and one of its greatest strengths. Mental health among students is not just a student issue, it’s a Harvard issue, a University issue. It’s one that affects, and is affected by, everyone on campus. Undergrads, graduate students, professional staff, tenure and tenure-track professors, other members of the teaching community, police, HUHS — everyone has a role to play in the environment that we create for our students, and it’s critically important to have everyone at the table. I’ve already seen the interest, investment, and passion on all sides.SMALL: The size and composition of the task force is its biggest asset, and its greatest challenge.The asset is very clear. We have an extraordinary amount of expertise and talent in the room both from Harvard and other universities — people who have particular skills and knowledge in terms of mental health. We have psychologists, psychiatrists, academics, experts on running institutions, people who have had one-to-one contact with students facing mental health issues; we have students grad and undergrad; we have regular faculty, people from all sorts of backgrounds; we have women and men; we have people from multiple backgrounds with regards to sexuality; we have people of diverse ethnic and racial backgrounds. In multiple ways, the diversity of the group reflects the diversity of our institutions.The challenge is twofold: getting diverse sets of people on the same page as to what we should be doing, and determining what constitutes an effective process. Big groups — all else being equal — tend to move more slowly than small groups. We must work quickly to get people to understand the process, ensure that their voices are heard, and then move forward in a collaborative way. I think we can meet that challenge.GAZETTE: It’s of course very early. The first task force meetings took place this February, and then the working groups convened in March, and I imagine that you want to guide a productive conversation, rather than make pre-emptive decisions about what Harvard needs vis-à-vis mental health. But how do you begin to think about what success would look like?NOCK: I think the first thing that we have to do as a task force is get a good understanding of the nature of mental health concerns among students. The good news is that there are existing data to provide a baseline for our work. I am currently part of a team of cross-national researchers looking at mental health problems in college students in over a dozen schools worldwide (including Harvard), and we have learned that more than 20 percent of students have a mental disorder in a given year. We also know that in more than 50 percent of cases they had those disorders before they entered college, and only less than 20 percent of those students will seek mental health treatment while in college. This suggests to me that there are some clear things we could be doing differently, and others we should work to strengthen.We need to work hard to identify the students who are coming into College with existing disorders, reach out to them, and better direct those who are struggling with mental health concerns into treatment. There are already excellent mental health resources at Harvard that aren’t being used as much as they perhaps should be. One easy thing we can do is to help better connect students with them. That might mean more active outreach, or that might mean trying to identify and remove existing barriers for students, including attitudinal barriers (thinking they might not need help, not trusting the help, or not trusting there’s not going to be forced mental health leave) and structural barriers — we’ve heard from students that it might be difficult to get to mental health services even on campus. When bottlenecks occur, can we take the lead as a university in bringing treatments to students so that they can use them where and when they need them?Looking forward, what gives me hope is that there has been an explosion of new approaches to identifying and helping people to manage and overcome mental health challenges using things like new technologies. Harvard is already using some of these. There are online psych interventions for things like depression, insomnia, and anxiety that have been shown in randomized trials to be extremely effective.SMALL: There are already great resources here at Harvard, but also aspects of mental health that require immediate attention, and we’re going to identify those and work on them as quickly as we can responsibly. For other aspects that cannot be met immediately, we will proceed thoughtfully.The first thing we need to do is ensure that every member of the task force has a strong idea of exactly what we’re dealing with. We have some statistics. What do the numbers say about the incidence of loneliness and depression and anxiety and other indicators of mental health? We want to get a really concrete sense of what we know.We also want to gain a better sense of what we don’t know. What are the important gaps in the statistics we collect? And thirdly, in terms of understanding the data, we need to be able to parse which issues are not general but specific to particular groups, subgroups, or units. What are the things only people in a given School or with a given background are facing? We need to know that as well. To my mind, one of the very first tasks is to get a very clear sense of the scope of the issue.  DENCH: In the short term, success means identifying the most challenging problems. I’m hoping this will happen reasonably efficiently so that, as both Matt and Mario mentioned, we can begin to determine where the gaps are. In the medium to long term, after conversation with, most importantly, students, but also with the faculty and staff who engage with them, I’m confident we’ll begin to identify precise deliverables that will have immediate impact on the student experience. I’m already thinking about one way to improve mental health access and care — the centralization of information. Something as simple as a one-stop source for information would be pretty revolutionary, as well as powerful and effective.One of the reasons I am so energized by the work we are undertaking is that it isn’t simply about addressing problems that our students are having — it’s about improving their experience as students and as human beings. In thinking about this, I’m drawn to a sentence in the document that lays out the task force’s role: “Mental health is not a problem to address in a few students but an element of well-being to cultivate among all.” That is very well said and something we all should bear in mind.This interview has been lightly edited for length and clarity.last_img read more

Costa Rica and U.S. Coast Guards Cooperate in Major Drug Seizure

first_img Colombian National Army dismantles terrorist camps On January 20 in the northern Department of Córdoba, Soldiers with the Army’s Ground Combat No. 33 dismantled a clandestine, coca paste-processing laboratory owned by the FARC’s 58th Front. There, they destroyed 13 gallons of liquid chemicals, a spray pump, a coca leaf press, and other equipment. Costa Rican Public Security Minister Celso Gamboa, who said the marijuana was destined for his country, described the bust as the first important marijuana seizure of the year after Costa Rica confiscated more than seven metric tons of the drug in 2014. By Dialogo January 23, 2015 Meanwhile, in the Departments of Meta and Boyacá, the Army destroyed two camps – one belonging to the FARC and one to the ELN – both on January 20. The first camp, which was found in Meta before being dismantled by Army Troops, accommodated seven members of the FARC’s Joselo Lozada Front. The Army’s Second Division destroyed the second camp in Boyacá, which was used by the ELN’s José David Suárez Front. During that operation, Soldiers found a handmade bomb at the camp. That’s when a U.S. P3 surveillance plane informed Costa Rican and Colombian security forces about a suspicious vessel about 32 kilometers off the Costa Rican coast. When Costa Rica’s Coast Guard interdicted the vessel, they collected 38 bags of marijuana that had been tossed overboard by the five crew members, who were all captured. Three of the suspects are Jamaican nationals, one is Nicaraguan, and one is Costa Rican, they said. On January 20 in the northern Department of Córdoba, Soldiers with the Army’s Ground Combat No. 33 dismantled a clandestine, coca paste-processing laboratory owned by the FARC’s 58th Front. There, they destroyed 13 gallons of liquid chemicals, a spray pump, a coca leaf press, and other equipment. And in the Department of Cauca, Soldiers with the Army’s Ground Combat No. 109 unit destroyed a field containing 3,500 coca plants. The Army is investigating who owned the coca, which is the main ingredient used to produce cocaine. The Colombian National Army carried out several counter-narcotics operations in five Departments from January 20-21, primarily targeting the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) and the National Liberation Army (ELN), which use proceeds from drug trafficking to finance their terrorist operations. In the Department of Norte de Santander, Troops with the Army’s Vulcano Task Force cleared two ELN minefields. The ELN had planted 25 kilograms of explosives throughout the fields, which serve as a common passage for Soldiers patrolling the area. The first camp, which was found in Meta before being dismantled by Army Troops, accommodated seven members of the FARC’s Joselo Lozada Front. The Army’s Second Division destroyed the second camp in Boyacá, which was used by the ELN’s José David Suárez Front. During that operation, Soldiers found a handmade bomb at the camp. The Coast Guards from Costa Rica and the United States recently cooperated to seize a metric ton of high-grade marijuana and capture five suspects. The operation took place off the Caribbean coast of the Costa Rican province of Limón on January 18. The following day, on January 21, the Army’s Ground Combat Battalion No. 143 destroyed 60 kilograms of processed coca leaves in an ELN drug laboratory in the municipality of Teorama in the Department of Norte de Santander. Costa Rican Public Security Minister Celso Gamboa, who said the marijuana was destined for his country, described the bust as the first important marijuana seizure of the year after Costa Rica confiscated more than seven metric tons of the drug in 2014. The Colombian National Army carried out several counter-narcotics operations in five Departments from January 20-21, primarily targeting the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) and the National Liberation Army (ELN), which use proceeds from drug trafficking to finance their terrorist operations. Meanwhile, in the Departments of Meta and Boyacá, the Army destroyed two camps – one belonging to the FARC and one to the ELN – both on January 20. That’s when a U.S. P3 surveillance plane informed Costa Rican and Colombian security forces about a suspicious vessel about 32 kilometers off the Costa Rican coast. When Costa Rica’s Coast Guard interdicted the vessel, they collected 38 bags of marijuana that had been tossed overboard by the five crew members, who were all captured. Three of the suspects are Jamaican nationals, one is Nicaraguan, and one is Costa Rican, they said. The following day, on January 21, the Army’s Ground Combat Battalion No. 143 destroyed 60 kilograms of processed coca leaves in an ELN drug laboratory in the municipality of Teorama in the Department of Norte de Santander. And in the Department of Cauca, Soldiers with the Army’s Ground Combat No. 109 unit destroyed a field containing 3,500 coca plants. The Army is investigating who owned the coca, which is the main ingredient used to produce cocaine. In the Department of Norte de Santander, Troops with the Army’s Vulcano Task Force cleared two ELN minefields. The ELN had planted 25 kilograms of explosives throughout the fields, which serve as a common passage for Soldiers patrolling the area. Colombian National Army dismantles terrorist camps The Coast Guards from Costa Rica and the United States recently cooperated to seize a metric ton of high-grade marijuana and capture five suspects. The operation took place off the Caribbean coast of the Costa Rican province of Limón on January 18. last_img read more

Uniline opened a new business headquarters and introduced a new business philosophy

first_img“The borders are there to move. And we have shown it so far, we will show it in the future, ”Said Boris Žgomba, co-owner and President of the Management Board of Uniline, in front of the gathered guests and business partners during the opening of the new business headquarters in Pula.It is a new functional workspace with a total area of ​​2500 m2 on 5 floors and offices on the principle of open space and a spacious parking lot, and the entire investment amounts to 16 million kuna. What is certainly significant for Uniline is that for the first time all departments and services have been united and integrated, which enhances, accelerates, but also rationalizes the current company business, which has so far been scattered in several offices in Pula.The entire preparation, construction and equipping of the new Uniline business headquarters took less than a year and a half, and the construction itself a little more than eight months. The new building has 5 conference halls and a special space for employees to relax, and it accommodates about 150 workers. “We have come a really long way – from 1996 and two offices in the Pula hotel Riviera to today’s modern and sophisticated business building and learned and applied a lot. What we have learned first is that we must constantly and permanently listen to the needs of our guests and design and deliver our tourism products accordingly. Therefore, the opening of the new headquarters symbolically marks our entry into a new development dimension, which means that we have decided on a new company vision, mission and brand idea. ” Žgomba points out. New business philosophy – Emotions We Share               The new building represents a new milestone for Uniline and they are embarking on new business challenges with a new business philosophy and a new brand – Emotions We Share. “Everything stems from a new environment in which modern 21st century companies can only operate successfully if they have their own content, which means attractive, inspiring and special tourist experiences. Therefore, we position ourselves as a leading content travel company in designing and offering innovative experiences in Southeast Europe. As part of the new mission, we want to create them together with our clients and business partners in a sustainable environment. From this came a new brand idea: Emotions We Share! In short, our focus is on modern guests of the 21st century, who are looking for an empathetic, emotional and dynamic relationship and approach and experiences in the form of credible stories. ” concluded Zgomba.By the way, Uniline is the leading Croatian tour operator and the seventh largest company in the Croatian tourism sector in terms of total annual revenue, and today it employs more than 200 employees with an average age of 28,5 years. Uniline operates in Croatia and the countries of the region, but also in distant Asian markets, such as Shanghai in China and Seoul in South Korea, while the company’s services are used by 380 guests a year.last_img read more

Government, Bio Farma secure vaccine bulk supply from China’s Sinovac

first_imgUnder the first agreement, Sinovac is to start shipping the coronavirus vaccine to Indonesia in November.“First is the preliminary agreement [on] the purchase and supply of the COVID-19 vaccine [bulk], which is an agreed commitment to supply 40 million doses from November 2020 to March 2021,” Retno said.The second agreement is a memorandum of understanding that extends the cooperation until the end of 2021, under which Sinovac commits to providing priority access to Bio Farma to purchase more vaccine bulk.Sinovac last week launched the final stage of the phase three clinical trial for the CoronaVac vaccine it is developing with Bio Farma, with the final stage involving 1,620 patient volunteers in Bandung, West Java. Southeast Asia’s largest economy has secured priority access to the COVID-19 vaccine bulk developed by China’s Sinovac Biotech through a deal with state-owned pharmaceuticals Bio Farma.A vaccine bulk is an aqueous form of the purified antigens, or vaccine, provided in a large container from which the individual vials are filled.Foreign Minister Retno LP Marsudi announced the deal on Thursday evening at a virtual press conference in Sanya in China’s south, where Bio Farma signed two agreements on the vaccine cooperation with Sinovac. The six-month clinical trial of the vaccine in Indonesia comes as the country continues to struggle with rising infection, recording 2,266 new cases on Thursday to bring the cumulative nationwide tally to 147,211 confirmed cases.Read also: Sinovac launches late-stage trial for potential COVID-19 vaccine in IndonesiaState-Owned Enterprises Minister Erick Thohir accompanied Retno to the meeting with Chinese officials in the resort city on Hainan Island, the Chinese outpost in the South China Sea. The two ministers also met with representatives from China Railway during the overseas visit, Retno’s first in six months.Earlier this month, Erick claimed that Bio Farma would be ready to produce 250 million doses of CoronaVac per year once the trials had been completed by the year-end.Retno is the first foreign minister China has received amid its ongoing COVID-19 response efforts on the mainland. According to a statement from the Chinese foreign ministry, her reception “shows that China and Indonesia both attach high importance to bilateral relations”.The Indonesian delegation also explored potential collaboration opportunities with other Chinese drug manufacturers, including Sinopharm. The state-owned Chinese pharmaceuticals has said that its candidate vaccine may cost no more than 1,000 yuan (US$144.27) for two injections once it had completed its clinical trials and began mass production, reports Reuters.CanSino Biologics is another Chinese company that Indonesia is considering for possible cooperation. The company has started late-stage clinical trials for its candidate vaccine in a number of countries, while Beijing has already approved its use for the nation’s military.In a meeting with Chinese counterpart State Councilor Wang Yi to follow up a virtual meeting in late July, Retno stressed the importance of an effective, safe, timely and affordable vaccine for COVID-19.“Indonesia has seen strong commitment from a number of pharmaceutical manufacturers in China to collaborate on the vaccine [development] with Indonesia. We are also seeing the commitment of the Chinese government in supporting this cooperation,” she said.Meanwhile, Erick said that the visit intended to ensure that any transformation of Indonesia’s health industry through this cooperation would result in a win-win solution.“This is so Bio Farma won’t just be seen as a tailor [whose job is just to piece together garments], but as a party to an agreement with Sinovac that includes transfer of knowledge and technology,” he said. The minister issued similar remarks to CanSino and Sinopharm as well.“Hopefully, we can soon rise above COVID-19 in step with the time frame […] and [achieve] mass immunization of the Indonesian people by early next year,” Erick added.Retno was quick to add that Indonesia would continue shopping around for initiatives with other countries and that it was already in touch with parties other than China, “so that we can get better results amid the very tight competition”.Read also: Indonesia teams up with global manufacturers in vaccine huntIndonesia is also developing its own COVID-19 vaccine prototype, dubbed Merah Putih, toward achieving vaccine self-sufficiency.With nearly 23 million confirmed cases around the world, hundreds of pharmaceutical research institutes are scrambling to come up with a vaccine while dozens of governments are taking aggressive steps to secure any future stockpiles.The alarming pace at which pharmaceutical firms are fast-tracking vaccine development has prompted the World Health Organization to warn drugmakers that proper vaccine development could take 12 to 18 months.To further clear the path in supply and distribution, Indonesia and China have also agreed to arrange a “travel corridor” for essential businesses.“This is the third travel corridor for essential businesses that we have made with other countries, after the United Arab Emirates on July 29 and South Korea on Aug. 17,” said Retno, who is heading to the UAE with Erick after the China visit.Other bilateral issues discussed during the visit included trade as well as the ongoing investigation over alleged human trafficking of Indonesian crew aboard Chinese fishing vessels. Regional issues included the China-ASEAN dialogue partnership, which will mark 30 years next year.“Indonesia is confident that the ASEAN-China partnership will stay strong as long as it is always carried out [according to] international law, including when we discuss the South China Sea issue,” Retno said.Topics :last_img read more

This five-bedroom family Queenslander is for sale

first_img57 McIlwraith Ave, Norman ParkON the market for the first time in more than 15 years, this character house offers two levels of living on a north-facing 810sq m block.Restored with high-end appointments while retaining its classic period appeal, the gabled Queenslander at 57 McIlwraith Ave, Norman Park, offers a wealth of space for outdoor entertaining, including a large back yard and front and rear timber verandas. On entry to the upper level is a central sitting room, with a living room beyond.To the right of the floorplan is the main bedroom, spanning the width of the residence and including a walk-in wardrobe and an ensuite, along with enough space for a lounge setting.The left side of the level houses a dining room and kitchen, the cooking space making a statement with its black granite benchtop and mix of white and timber cabinetry.57 McIlwraith Ave, Norman ParkMore from newsCrowd expected as mega estate goes under the hammer7 Aug 2020Hard work, resourcefulness and $17k bring old Ipswich home back to life20 Apr 2020From the dining room there is access to the front veranda, a lovely spot for relaxing with its ceiling fan and suburban views and city glimpses.Beyond the dining room is a bathroom, along with another bedroom with built-in wardrobes.Varying features in the bedrooms include ceiling fans, airconditioning and either carpet or timber flooring, with timber flooring, VJ walls and white plantation shutters decorating the main living areas.Downstairs, a rumpus room offers access to front and rear patios, the rear overlooking the leafy yard and the front enjoying views to established gardens.57 McIlwraith Ave, Norman ParkTo the left of the rumpus room are a study, a bathroom and a bedroom with a walk-in wardrobe and double doors to the rear patio, while to the right is another bedroom with a walk-in wardrobe and a laundry that connects to a double garage.Ray White Stones Corner marketing agent Ben Cannon described the residence as a desirable family home, located in a sought-after area close to parks and cafes.“The kitchen is centrally located for year-round entertaining, the main bedroom has high feature ceilings, an array of barbecue facilities can be found on the rear veranda, and there is ample storage space throughout,” Cannon said.“This character home with exquisite appointments is also close to some of Brisbane’s best schools.”last_img read more