November 2020

Fortnite to Return to iPhone, iPad via Nvidia GeForce Now Cloud Gaming Service: Report

first_img– Advertisement – Users of Apple’s iPhone and iPad could soon be able to play Epic Games’s Fortnite game again via Nvidia’s cloud gaming service, the BBC reported on Thursday.Nvidia has developed a version of its GeForce cloud gaming service that runs in the mobile web browser Safari, the report said.- Advertisement – Apple did not immediately respond to a Reuters request for comment, while Epic declined to comment.Nvidia said it would not comment on any new clients coming to the service, or on the availability of any game on unannounced or unreleased platforms.The company is expected to announce updates to its GeForce Now service later this month with support to Apple’s iOS.- Advertisement – Are iPhone 12 mini, HomePod mini the Perfect Apple Devices for India? We discussed this on Orbital, our weekly technology podcast, which you can subscribe to via Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, or RSS, download the episode, or just hit the play button below. Apple’s rules require cloud gaming companies to submit each game title in the catalogue as a separate app for Apple to review, and the master catalogue app would then provide links to the individual titles. That requirement puts a hurdle to the seamless experience cloud gaming companies intend to provide their users.Microsoft, which has a game-streaming feature in its premium Xbox Game Pass subscription, has previously criticised Apple for such rules.© Thomson Reuters 2020- Advertisement –last_img read more

Tropical Storm Eta Heads Toward South Florida After Strengthening

first_img– Advertisement – Tropical Storm Eta, the 28th named storm of this year’s busy hurricane season, has strengthened and is expected to bring strong winds, heavy rains and dangerous storm surge to the Florida Keys and South Florida by late Sunday, the National Hurricane Center said.Eta devastated portions of Central America, where it started Tuesday as a Category 4 hurricane, leaving more than 50 dead in its wake before weakening to a tropical depression. The storm passed over the Cayman Islands and the northwestern Bahamas on Saturday and made landfall on the south-central coast of Cuba early Sunday morning.- Advertisement – Eta made landfall in Nicaragua as a Category 4 hurricane, bringing devastation to portions of Central America with winds of up to 140 m.p.h. and heavy rainfall that reached 35 inches in some areas.Flooding and mudslides contributed to at least 57 deaths in Guatemala, the country’s president, Alejandro Giammattei, said at a news conference on Thursday. One mudslide buried 25 houses with dozens trapped inside, according to The Associated Press.Two miners were killed in mudslides in Nicaragua, The A.P. reported. In Honduras, a 12-year-old girl was killed when she became trapped in a mudslide.The storm was downgraded to a tropical depression as it traveled over mountainous terrain, Mr. Feltgen said, but by Saturday it had strengthened again into a tropical storm.With Eta, the unusually busy 2020 season tied the record for the most storms with 2005, when Hurricanes Katrina, Rita and Wilma battered the Gulf Coast. That year, so many storms grew strong enough to be named that meteorologists had to resort to the Greek alphabet after exhausting the list of rotating names maintained by the World Meteorological Organization. A tropical storm warning was in effect for South Florida, from the Brevard and Volusia County line to Englewood, including Florida Bay and Lake Okeechobee.Dennis Feltgen, a meteorologist and spokesman at the National Hurricane Center in Miami, said the storm had expanded since it hit Central America. Eta’s zigzag path, steered by high and low pressure systems, was not uncommon for storms that form later in the season, he said.Forecasters predict six to 12 inches of rain, with isolated instances of 18 inches possible, in parts of South and Central Florida. Tropical storm force winds were expected to arrive in Florida by Sunday night.- Advertisement – It was expected to bring tropical storm conditions, including heavy rains and dangerous flooding, as it approached the Florida Keys and South Florida, according to a National Hurricane Center advisory issued on Sunday morning.The storm could reach hurricane strength by the time it hits Florida, the center said.A hurricane watch was in effect for the Florida coast from Deerfield Beach to Bonita Beach, and for the Florida Keys, from Ocean Reef to the Dry Tortugas, including Florida Bay.center_img “We always say there’s no such thing as just a tropical storm,” Mr. Feltgen said. “You can get some very serious impacts from a tropical storm. This is a very big, very serious rainfall event.” “We had some pretty heavy rain on the grounds here in October, so the ground is already pretty saturated,” Mr. Feltgen said. “We’re looking at the potential for a lot of urban flooding around here.”On Sunday morning, the storm was 60 miles southwest of Camaguey, Cuba, and 280 miles south-southeast of Miami. It was traveling northeast at about 12 miles per hour with wind speeds of 60 m.p.h., the advisory said. – Advertisement –last_img read more

Nikola discloses grand jury subpoenas from DOJ

first_img– Advertisement – – Advertisement – The report had claimed that Milton, who has since resigned as chairman, had made false claims about the company’s proprietary technology to form partnerships with large automakers. Nikola publicly rejected all accusations. Trevor Milton CEO of NikolaMassimo Pinca | Reuters Nikola and its founder Trevor Milton received grand jury subpoenas from the U.S. Department of Justice in September in connection to allegations of fraud by short-seller Hindenburg, the electric-truck maker said in a regulatory filing late on Monday.The company also received a grand jury subpoena from the New York County District Attorney’s Office in the same month.The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission also issued subpoenas to Nikola, its board and eight of its officers and employees in September, the company disclosed in the filing, which was prompted by the short-seller’s scathing report earlier that month.- Advertisement –last_img read more

Rebel Wilson: I’ve ‘Come Into My Own’ During My Wellness Journey

first_imgRebel Wilson’s Transformation Through the Years Read article “I feel so much healthier,” the Pitch Perfect actress, 40, said on the Tuesday, November 10, episode of The Drew Barrymore Show. “And I don’t know whether it’s a thing with ladies when you turn 40, [but] I feel like I really have come into my own now and not just with health but with my career.”Wilson continued, “I feel more in control and I get to produce movies now, which is amazing, and kind of have more control of the content. I just feel like everything seems to be coming together, maybe I’m a late bloomer or something, but I’m slowly getting it together.”Rebel Wilson: I’ve ‘Come Into My Own’ During My Wellness JourneyCourtesy of Rebel Wilson/InstagramThe Australia native also got candid about the road to her prioritizing her health. She admitted that she realized she was an emotional eater, which was sparked by the pressure of becoming a household name. “I was going all around the world, jet setting everywhere and eating a ton of sugar — that was kind of my vice. I have a very sweet tooth, I love desserts,” she explained. “I’ve tried, like so many women out there, fads and diets and things before and I’m like, ‘I need to do a really holistic approach this time.’ I think what I mainly suffered from was emotional eating and dealing with the stress of becoming famous internationally. There is a lot of stress that comes with it and I guess my way of dealing with it was just like eating donuts.”The Hustle star continued, “So, I was working on the mental side of things of why was I doing that and why was I not valuing myself and having better self-worth? And then, also on the nutritional side. My diet was mainly all carbs, which are delicious but for my body type, I needed to eat more protein.”Rebel Wilson: I’ve ‘Come Into My Own’ During My Wellness JourneyRebel Wilson. Courtesy of Rebel Wilson/Instagram- Advertisement – When Wilson announced her “year of health,” she said that she aimed to hit 165 pounds. In October, the Cats actress revealed that she was 6 pounds away from her goal weight.The How to Be Single actress previously said that she has been trying to curb her sugar intake, and she even admitted to having “a bottle of water” in August instead of “reaching for the candies.”In September, Us Weekly confirmed that Wilson is dating Anheuser-Busch heir Jacob Busch. “Jacob adored Rebel last year before she went on her health journey,” an insider told Us at the time. “He is very old school and he is a gentleman in the way he treats Rebel. He seems to be very in love with her.” Celebrating progress. Rebel Wilson recognizes how far she has come while committing to her “year of health.” Read article Wilson has lost around 40 pounds since beginning her wellness journey in January, and she intends to “lose a few more” pounds going forward. Despite her continued plans to slim down, she said she still does “love my curves” and does not anticipate that she will “ever go too skinny.” Celebrities’ Biggest Weight Loss Transformations: Before and After Pics- Advertisement – Rebel Wilson Celebrates Halloween With BF Jacob Busch: Inside Their Romance Read article – Advertisement – – Advertisement –last_img read more

Democrats and Republicans face perhaps the most up-for-grabs electoral landscape in a generation.

first_img– Advertisement – WASHINGTON — America’s two major parties had hoped the 2020 presidential election would render a decisive judgment on the country’s political trajectory. But after a race that broke records for voter turnout and campaign spending, neither Democrats nor Republicans have achieved the upper hand.Instead, the election delivered a split decision, ousting President Trump but narrowing the Democratic majority in the House and perhaps preserving the Republican majority in the Senate. As President-elect Joseph R. Biden Jr. prepares to take office and preside over a closely divided government, leaders in both camps are acknowledging that voters seem to have issued not a mandate for the left or the right but a muddled plea to move on from Trump-style chaos.- Advertisement – The election also represented a continuation of this trench warfare between two parties that are increasingly defined by their activist flanks and limited to only incremental advances.- Advertisement – Both parties find themselves stretched thin and battling on new fronts, with their traditional strongholds increasingly under siege. Indeed, Democrats and Republicans are facing perhaps the most unsettled and up-for-grabs electoral map the country has seen since the parties fought over California in the late 1980s.This competition has denied either party the ability to claim broad majorities and has prompted a series of election cycles, which could be repeated in 2022, in which any gains Democrats make in the country’s booming cities and states are at least partly offset by growing Republican strength in rural areas. “We are more divided than any other time in my lifetime,” said Haley Barbour, the former Mississippi governor and Republican National Committee chair, whose first job in politics was on Richard M. Nixon’s 1968 campaign. “But usually when we’re at parity we’re bunched up in the middle — now we’ve got parity but with extreme polarity.”last_img read more

Thai researcher says dog had H5N1 avian flu

first_imgAug 31, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – A dog in Thailand’s central Suphan Buri province contracted avian influenza after eating infected ducks, according to a Thai researcher quoted in a newspaper.Yong Pooworawan, a lecturer at Chulalongkorn University, disclosed the case yesterday at a university seminar. He said a researcher at Kasetsart University had discovered the case and that it would be described soon in an American medical journal, according to a report today in The Nation, a Thai daily newspaper. Yong did not elaborate on the findings.If confirmed, the Thai report apparently would be the first known case of H5N1 infection in a dog. The medical literature contains reports of the H5N1 virus in domestic cats, leopards, tigers, and civets, but none involving dogs.After the seminar, Rattathan Pattanarangsan, a veterinarian from Mahidol University, urged the Thai public not to panic over the possibility of avian flu in dogs. “Please do not abandon your dogs in pubic places. You can prevent them from getting bird flu,” he told The Nation. “Make sure you bury dead or ill chickens deep in the ground.” He added that it would be very difficult for dogs to transmit the avian flu virus to humans.Confirmation of the report would likely raise fresh concerns about the virus in pets. In March, Germany confirmed that a cat on the Baltic Sea island of Ruegen died of H5N1 infection. That case represented the first known report of H5N1 in a mammal in Europe.Following that report, European Union veterinarians in Brussels urged people living in areas experiencing avian flu outbreaks to keep their cats indoors and their dogs leashed. A German humane society said publicity about the cat case prompted hundreds of German cat owners to abandon their pets at shelters.The role of cats in the spread of avian flu has been controversial. Medical and veterinary experts published a commentary in the April 5 issue of Nature suggesting there was growing evidence that cats may play a role in spreading the H5N1 virus. They contended that H5N1-infected cats were common in Indonesia, Thailand, and Iraq. They also wrote that other carnivores such as dogs, foxes, members of the weasel family, and seals may be susceptible to the H5N1 virus.The World Health Organization (WHO), however, has downplayed the role of cats in the spread of avian flu. In a February statement the WHO said there was no evidence that cats were a reservoir for the H5N1 virus and that so far no human cases had been linked to infected cats.See also:Apr 5, 2006 CIDRAP News article “Experts urge including cats in avian flu precautions”http://www.cidrap.umn.edu/cidrap/content/influenza/avianflu/news/april0506cats.htmlWHO report on avian flu in catshttp://www.who.int/csr/don/2006_02_28a/en/index.htmllast_img read more

WHO seeks urgent push for pandemic flu vaccines

first_imgOct 23, 2006 (CIDRAP News) –Warning that the world is billions of doses short of the amount of vaccine needed to prepare for an influenza pandemic, the World Health Organization (WHO) today called for an urgent and coordinated international effort to make up the deficit.The agency recommended an immediate campaign to boost vaccine production capacity and develop vaccines that would provide broader and more durable protection—while cautioning that such efforts will not bear fruit for another 3 to 5 years.”We are presently several billion doses short of the amount of pandemic influenza vaccine we would need to protect the global population,” Dr. Marie-Paule Kieny, director of the WHO Initiative for Vaccine Research, said in a news release. “This could lead to a public health crisis.””Importantly, none of the strategies will be able to fill the gap in the immediate short term but, if action is taken now, should bear fruit within a future time frame of three to five years,” states the official summary of the WHO’s “Global pandemic influenza action plan to increase vaccine supply.”The report is the product of a meeting of 120 experts in Geneva in May.The WHO estimates the cost of the needed initiatives at US $3 billion to $10 billion.The world’s current production capacity for seasonal flu vaccine is estimated at 350 million doses a year, which could perhaps be pushed to 500 million doses with round-the-clock operation (each dose containing 15 micrograms of antigen for each of three flu strains), the report says.  Current expansion plans are expected to add another 280 million doses of annual capacity over the next 2 to 3 years, pushing the total to a maximum of 780 million doses.Under the most optimistic assumptions, if all facilities converted to making a single-strain pandemic flu vaccine, maximum world capacity by 2008 or 2009 would be about 2.34 billion doses, the report says. Given a world population of 6.7 billion, this would fall several billion doses short of the expected demand in a pandemic, it states.Further, it says that current egg-based production methods don’t work nearly as well for H5N1 flu vaccines as they do for seasonal flu vaccines. As a result, the current maximum capacity to make H5N1 vaccine is only about 500 million (single-strain) doses a year. Because each person would probably need two doses, only 250 million people could be fully vaccinated in a year.The WHO lays out three main steps for closing the vaccine supply gap:Increase use of seasonal flu vaccine to stimulate industry to produce more (while protecting more people from seasonal flu)Increase vaccine production capacity by improving yields and building new plantsIncrease research to (1) develop better vaccines that provide more protection with fewer doses and (2) produce vaccines faster and more efficientlyThe most direct way to improve production capacity is to increase the production yield and immunogenicity of H5N-based vaccines, the report says. The WHO hopes to improve coordination of efforts in this area by “creating a collaborative consortium of laboratories with the objective of developing better candidate prototype vaccine strains.”The plan lists various possibilities for building new vaccine production facilities, including transferring egg-based or cell-culture production to potential new manufacturers and partially converting veterinary vaccine production facilities to produce human flu vaccines.The report says various strategies may help increase production yields. Several candidate vaccines containing adjuvants—chemicals that stimulate the immune system—will be tested over the next 2 years, but funding will be needed to accelerate the systematic evaluation of the formulations under development, the WHO says.The agency also calls for more research on live attenuated flu vaccines, saying they may be more effective than inactivated vaccines, cost less to produce, and have higher yields. The plan also advocates further assessment of killed, whole-virus vaccines and of administering vaccines intradermally rather than intramuscularly.The WHO estimates the cost of all the strategies for boosting vaccine yields and production capacity at anywhere from $2 billion to $9 billion.Concerning the quest for better vaccines, the report says the ideal vaccine is one that is safe and effective in all target groups with a single dose, is easily produced on a large scale, is thermostable, provides protection for at least a year, and protects against “antigenically drifted” flu strains.The report recommends a number of approaches for developing better vaccines:Evaluate new adjuvantsAssess the molecular basis for the immunogenicity of hemagglutinin, one of the two surface proteins on flu virusesDevelop new-generation vaccines, such as ones that target viral proteins other than hemagglutininDetermine the potential benefits of giving a pre-pandemic vaccine to prime the immune system to respond to later vaccination with a pandemic vaccine.The plan also advocates standardizing protocols for evaluating new vaccine candidates and defining immune responses in lab animals that correlate with protection in humans.See also:Oct 23 WHO news releasehttp://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/releases/2006/pr58/en/index.htmlWHO reporthttp://www.who.int/csr/resources/publications/influenza/CDS_EPR_GIP_2006_1.pdflast_img read more

THE PANDEMIC VACCINE PUZZLE Bibliography

first_img Osterholm MT. Author interviews with Michael Osterholm. May 3 and Aug 2, 2007 WHO. Global Advisory Committee on Vaccine Safety, 6-7 June 2006. Meeting report released Jun 14, 2006 [Full text] Schwartz SI. Atomic audit : the costs and consequences of U.S. nuclear weapons since 1940. Washington, DC: Brookings Institution Press, 1998 Fedson DS. Author interview with David Fedson. Jun 19, 2007 CDC. State-specific influenza vaccination coverage among adults aged >/= 18 years—United States, 2003-04 and 2005-06 influenza seasons. MMWR 2007 Sep 21;56(37):953-9 [Full text] HHS. HHS awards two contracts to expand domestic vaccine manufacturing capacity for a potential influenza pandemic. Jun 14, 2007 [Full text] Fauci AS. Seasonal and pandemic influenza preparedness: science and countermeasures. J Infect Dis 2006 Nov 1;194(suppl 2):S73-6 [Full text] CDC. Prevention and control of influenza: recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP). MMWR 2005 Jul 29;54(RR08):1-40 [Full text] Osterholm MT. Preparing for the next pandemic. Foreign Aff 2005 Jul/Aug;84(4) [Full text] Belshe RB, Edwards KM, Vesikari T, et al. Live attenuated versus inactivated influenza vaccine in infants and young children. N Engl J Med 2007 Feb 15;256(7):685-96 [Abstract] WHO. Projected supply of pandemic influenza vaccine sharply increases. Oct 23, 2007 [Press release] Keitel W. A phase I-II, randomized, controlled, dose-ranging study of the safety, reactogenicity, and immunogenicity of intramuscular inactivated influenza A/H5N1 vaccine given alone or with aluminum hydroxide to healthy adults. Presented at the Options for the Control of Influenza VI meeting, Toronto, Jun 2007 Lowen AC, Mubareka S, Tumpey TM, et al. The guinea pig as a transmission model for human influenza viruses. Proc Natl Acad Sci 2006 June 27;103(26):9988-92 [Full text] Wood JM. International standards for H5N1 antibodies. Presented at the 3rd WHO meeting on evaluation of pandemic influenza prototype vaccines in clinical trials, Geneva, Feb 15-16, 2007 [Full text] Stephenson I, Bugarini R, Nicholson KG, et al. Cross-reactivity to highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 viruses after vaccination with nonadjuvanted and MF59-adjuvanted influenza A/duck/Singapore/97 (H5N3) vaccine: a potential priming strategy. J Infect Dis 2005 Apr 15;191(8):1210-5 [Full text] Goodman J. How fast can a new vaccine for an emerging respiratory virus be developed and available for use? Presented at the International Conference on Emerging Infectious Diseases, Atlanta, GA, Mar 22, 2006 Leroux-Roels K, Borkowski A, Vanwolleghem T, et al. Antigen sparing and cross-reactive immunity with an adjuvanted rH5N1 prototype pandemic influenza vaccine: a randomised controlled trial. Lancet 2007 Aug 18;370(9587):580-9 [Abstract] Novartis. Novartis gains European approval for its innovative flu vaccine Optaflu. Jun 13, 2007, news release Poland GA. Vaccines against avian influenza—a race against time. (Editorial) N Engl J Med 2006 Mar 30;354(13):1411-3 [Full text] Stephenson I, Gust I, Pervikov Y, et al. Development of vaccines against influenza H5. Lancet Infect Dis 2006 Aug;6(8):458-60 Fedson DS, Dunnill P. New approaches to confronting an imminent influenza pandemic. (Commentary) Perm J 2007 Summer;11(3):63-9 [Full text] NIAID (National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases). Report of the Blue Ribbon Panel on Influenza Research. Bethesda, Md., Sep 11-12, 2006. Posted Jun 2007 [Full text] Kreijtz JH, Bodewes R, van Amerongen G, et al. Primary influenza A virus infection induces cross-protective immunity against a lethal infection with a heterosubtypic virus strain in mice. Vaccine 2007 Jan 8;25(4):612-20 [Abstract] Protein Sciences Corp. Influenza vaccines under development. 2007 [Web page] BD. Author interview with George Goldman, Senior Director, Hypodermic Divison, BD Medical Surgical Systems. Jul 25, 2007 Belshe RB, Nichol KL, Black SB, et al. Safety, efficacy, and effectiveness of live, attenuated, cold-adapted influenza vaccine in an indicated population aged 5-49 years. Clin Infect Dis 2004 Oct 1;39(7):920-7 [Full text] GAO. Flu vaccine: steps are needed to better prepare for possible future shortages. Testimony by Janet Heinrich before US Senate Special Committee on Aging. GAO-01-786T. May 30, 2001 [Full text] FDA. Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee meeting transcript. Feb 27, 2007 [Full text] Petrovsky N. New-age vaccine adjuvants: friend or foe? BioPharm Int Aug 2, 2007 WHO. Cumulative number of confirmed human cases of avian influenza A/(H5N1) reported to WHO, 10 Sep 2007 Nicholson KG, Colegate AE, Podda A, et al. Safety and antigenicity of non-adjuvanted and MF59-adjuvanted influenza A/duck/Singapore/97 (H5N3) vaccine: a randomised trial of two potential vaccines against H5N1 influenza. Lancet 2001 Jun 16;357(9272):1937-43 [Abstract] Gosling FG. The Manhattan Project: making the atomic bomb. Oak Ridge, TN: US Department of Energy History Division, Jan 1999 Germann TC, Kadau K, Longini IR, et al. Mitigation strategies for pandemic influenza in the United States. Proc Natl Acad Sci 2006 Apr 11;103(15):5935-40 [Abstract] Grady D. With few suppliers of flu shots, shortage was long in making. New York Times. Oct 17, 2004 [Full text] GSK (GlaxoSmithKline). Backgrounder: Egg-based vs. cell-based influenza vaccine production. 2005 GSK. GlaxoSmithKline awarded $63 million HHS contract for pandemic vaccine research and development. Jan 17, 2007 [Press release] Smith GJD, Fan XH, Wang J, et al. Emergence and predominance of an H5N1 influenza variant in China. Proc Natl Acad Sci 2006 Nov 7;103(45):16936-41 [Abstract] Working Group for Pandemic Influenza Preparedness. Letter to Congress. May 23, 2006 Heilman C. Author interviews with Carole Heilman. Sep 13 and Sep 24, 2007 Novartis. Novartis receives US government contract to further develop a novel antigen technology that could extend vaccine supplies in a pandemic outbreak. Jan 17, 2007, news release [Full text] Vajo Z, Kosa L, Visontay I, et al. Inactivated whole virus influenza A (H5N1) vaccine. (Letter) Emerg Infect Dis 2007 May;13(5) (published online Mar 29) [Full text] McKenna M. System for global pandemic vaccine development challenged. Minneapolis, MN: CIDRAP News, Feb 6, 2007 [Full text] IDSA (Infectious Diseases Society of America). Pandemic and seasonal influenza principles for US action. Released Jan 25, 2007 [Full text] ECDC (European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control). ‘Pre-pandemic’ vaccines might offer protection but uncertainties remain. Sep 20, 2007 [Press release] IOM. Vaccines for the 21st century. Released Mar 1999 [Full text] HHS (Department of Health and Human Services). HHS awards contracts totaling more than $1 billion to develop cell-based influenza vaccine. May 4, 2006 [Full text] IOM (Institute of Medicine). New vaccine development. 1985;1 The series: The pandemic vaccine puzzle FDA. Guidance for industry: Clinical data needed to support the licensure of pandemic influenza vaccines. May 31, 2007 [Full text] GAO (Government Accountability Office, formerly General Accounting Office). Flu vaccine: recent supply shortages underscore ongoing challenges. Testimony by Janet Heinrich before House Subcommittee on Health, Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations, and Committee on Energy and Commerce. GAO-05-177T. Nov 18, 2004 [Full text] McKenna M. Virus ownership claims could disrupt flu vaccine system. Minneapolis, MN: CIDRAP News. Jun 19, 2007 [Full text] Palkonyay L. Personal communication from Laszlo Palkonyay, MD, medical officer, WHO Initiative for Vaccine Research. Oct 25, 2007 Lin J, Zhang J, Dong X, et al. Safety and immunogenicity of an inactivated adjuvanted whole-virion influenza A (H5N1) vaccine: a phase I randomised controlled trial. Lancet 2006 Sep 16;368(9540):991-7 [Abstract] Lipatov AS, Webby RJ, Govorkova EA, et al. Efficacy of H5 influenza vaccines produced by reverse genetics in a lethal mouse model. J Infect Dis 2005 Apr 15;191(8):1216-20 [Full text] Bosch Technologies. Author interview with Eric Isberg, Jack Lysfjord, and Tony Miller. Aug 3, 2007 CDC. Isolation of avian influenza A(H5N1) viruses from humans—Hong Kong. May-December 1997. MMWR 1997 Dec 19;46(50):1204-7 [Full text]center_img Editor’s note: This is the bibliography to a seven-part series launched October 25, 2007, investigating the prospects for development of vaccines to head off the threat of an influenza pandemic posed by the H5N1 avian influenza virus. The series puts advances in vaccine technology in perspective by illuminating the formidable barriers to producing an effective and widely usable vaccine in a short time frame. Treanor JJ, Schiff GM, Hayden FG, et al. Safety and immunogenicity of a baculovirus-expressed hemagglutinin influenza vaccine: a randomized controlled trial. JAMA 2007 Apr 11;297(14):1577-82 [Abstract] Trust for America’s Health/Infectious Diseases Society of America. Pandemic influenza: the state of the science. Oct 2006 [Full text] Monto A. Author interview with Arnold Monto. Aug 2, 2007 Trust for America’s Health. Flu spending update: pandemic planning and resource allocation. 2007 Luke CJ, Subbarao K. Vaccines for pandemic influenza. Emerg Infect Dis 2006 Jan;12(1):66-72 [Full text] NIH (National Institutes of Health). Flu 2001-2008 estimated budget numbers spreadsheet, compiled for the author by NIH press office. 2007 Rosenwald MS. FluMist gets a needed boost: refrigerated version cleared. Washington Post. Jan 9, 2007 [Full Text] ECDC. Technical report: Expert advisory groups on human H5N1 vaccines: scientific questions. Aug 2007 [Full text] Govorkova EA, Webby RJ, Humberd J, et al. Immunization with reverse-genetics–produced H5N1 influenza vaccine protects ferrets against homologous and heterologous challenge. J Infect Dis 2006 Jul 15;194(2):159-67 [Full text] Thomas A, Guldager N, Hermansen K. Pandemic flu preparedness: a manufacturing perspective. BioPharm Int 2007 Aug (supp) (published online Aug 2) Goodman J. Considerations in the pre- and early pandemic use of influenza vaccine. Presented at FDA Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee Meeting, Gaithersburg, MD, Feb 27, 2007 Longini IM, Nizam A, Xu S, et al. Containing pandemic influenza at the source. Science 2005 Aug 12;309(5737):1083-7 [Abstract] Part 1: Flu research: a legacy of neglectPart 2: Vaccine production capacity falls far shortPart 3: H5N1 poses major immunologic challengesPart 4: The promise and problems of adjuvantsPart 5: What role for prepandemic vaccination?Part 6: Looking to novel vaccine technologiesPart 7: Time for a vaccine ‘Manhattan Project’?Bibliography [you are here] Ferguson NM, Cummings DA, Fraser C, et al. Strategies for mitigating an influenza pandemic. (Letter) Nature 2006 Jul 27;442(7101):448-52 [Abstract] WHO. Global pandemic influenza action plan to increase vaccine supply. Released Oct 23, 2006 [Full text] Sanofi Pasteur. Sanofi Pasteur announces completion of construction of new U.S. influenza vaccine manufacturing facility. Jul 20, 2007, news release [Full text] Hoffenbach A. Update of Sanofi Pasteur EU pandemic vaccine clinical development. Presented at the 3rd WHO Meeting on Evaluation of Pandemic Influenza Prototype Vaccines in Clinical Trials, Geneva, Feb 14, 2007 [Full text] Santoli J. Influenza vaccine distribution data and use of data during the 2006-07 season. Presented at the National Influenza Vaccine Summit, Atlanta, Apr 2007 [Presentation] Stephenson I, Gust I, Kieny MP, et al. Development and evaluation of influenza pandemic vaccines. Lancet Infect Dis 2006 Feb;6(2):71-2 Riley S, Wu JT, Leung GM. Optimizing the dose of pre-pandemic influenza vaccines to reduce the infection attack rate. PLoS Med 2007 Jun;4(6):e218 [Full text] Strikas R. Pandemic influenza vaccine supply issues. Presented at the National Vaccine Advisory Committee Pandemic Influenza Working Group Meeting, Washington, DC, Apr 20, 2005 Kotalik J. Preparing for an influenza pandemic: ethical issues. Bioethics 2005 Aug;19(4):422-31 [Abstract] Fedson DS, Dunnill P. From scarcity to abundance: pandemic vaccines and other agents for “have not” countries. (Commentary) J Public Health Policy 2007;28(3):322-40 [Abstract] Acambis PLC. Acambis’ universal influenza vaccine enters phase 1 trial. Jul 17, 2007 Wood JM. Reference viruses for seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccine preparation. Influenza Other Respir Virus 2007 Jan;1(1):5-9 [Abstract] Bresson JL, Perrone C, Launay O, et al. Safety and immunogenicity of an inactivated split-virion influenza A/Vietnam/1194/2004 (H5N1) vaccine: phase I randomised trial. Lancet 2006 May 20;367(9523):1657-64 [Abstract] Treanor JJ (for Goji NA, Nolan C, Hill H, et al). Immune responses of healthy subjects to a single dose of intramuscular inactivated influenza A/Vietnam/1203/2004 (H5N1) vaccine after priming with an antigenic variant. Presented at 3rd WHO Meeting on Evaluation of Pandemic Influenza Prototype Vaccines in Clinical Trials, Geneva, Feb 15-16, 2007 [Full text] Wood JM. Author interview with John Wood. Jun 18, 2007 Fedson DS. Pandemic influenza and the global vaccine supply. Clin Infect Dis 2003 Jun 15;36(12):1552-61 [Full text] Working Group for Pandemic Influenza Preparedness. Letter to Congress. Nov 10, 2005 [Full text] Subbarao K, Joseph T. Scientific barriers to developing vaccines against avian influenza viruses. Nat Rev Immunol 2007 April;7(4):267-78 [Abstract] OIE (World Organization for Animal Health). Update on avian influenza in animals (type h5), 15 Sep 2007 [Link updated regularly] Frist W. The Manhattan project for the 21st century. Presented at Nantucket Atheneum, Nantucket, MA, Aug 3, 2005 [Full text] GAO. Flu vaccine: supply problems heighten need to ensure access for high-risk people. Report to Congressional Requestors. GAO-01-624. May 15, 2001 [Full text] Treanor JJ, Schiff GM, Couch RB, et al. Dose-related safety and immunogenicity of a trivalent baculovirus-expressed influenza-virus hemagglutinin vaccine in elderly adults. J Infect Dis 2006 May 1;193(9):1223-8 [Full text] Novartis. Flu Cell Culture Technology: The Next Frontier. 2006 Royal Society. Pandemic influenza: science to policy. Nov 2006 [Full text] Hehme N. GSK’s pandemic vaccine development: from 1st to to 2nd generation candidate vaccines. Presented at the 3rd WHO Meeting on Evaluation of Pandemic Influenza Prototype Vaccines in Clinical Trials, Geneva, Feb 15-16, 2007 [Full text] FDA. Guidance for industry: Clinical data needed to support the licensure of seasonal inactivated influenza vaccines. May 31, 2007 [Full text] WHO. WHO consultation on priority public health interventions before and during an influenza pandemic. Apr 27, 2004 Treanor JJ, Campbell JD, Zangwill KM, et al. Safety and immunogenicity of an inactivated subvirion influenza A (H5N1) vaccine. N Engl J Med 2006 Mar 30;354(13):1343-51 [Full text] Stephenson I, Nicholson KG, Wood JM, et al. Confronting the avian influenza threat: vaccine development for a potential pandemic. Lancet Infect Dis 2004 Aug;4(8):499-509 [Abstract] Schwartz B, Gellin B. Vaccination strategies for an influenza pandemic. (Commentary) J Infect Dis 2005 Apr 15;191(8):1207-9 [Full text] EMEA (European Medicines Agency). Guideline on adjuvants in vaccines for human use. Jan 20, 2005 [Full text] Fraser C. Influenza pandemic vaccines: spread them thin? PLoS Med 2007 Jun;4(6):e228 [Full text] Haaheim L. Vaccines for an influenza pandemic: scientific and political challenges. Influenza Other Respir Virus 2007;1(2):55-60 [Abstract] Lauerman J. Glaxo, Novartis, hurt by drug setbacks, may lose flu-shot race. Bloomberg News. Aug 23, 2007 [Full text] Working Group for Pandemic Influenza Preparedness. Letter to Congress. Jun 5, 2007 Poland GA. Author interview with Gregory Poland. Aug 1, 2007 Kresse H. Author interview with Hedwig Kresse. Aug 2, 2007 Zangwill K, Campbell J, Noah D, et al. Evaluation of a third dose of subvirion H5N1 influenza vaccine (rgA/Vietnam/1203/04 x PR8) in healthy adults. Presented at Options for the Control of Influenza VI, Toronto, Jun 17-23, 2007 Iomai. Iomai awarded government contract, totaling $128 million, to develop dose-sparing patch for use in an influenza pandemic. Jan 17, 2007 [Press release] Crosby AW. America’s forgotten pandemic: the influenza of 1918. Cambridge [England]; New York, Cambridge University Press, 1989last_img read more

H1N1 FLU BREAKING NEWS: More early-October vaccine; ethics reports; guide for community, faith groups; more cases on campus

first_imgSep 24, 2009Forecast for early-October vaccine deliveries doublesBetween 6 million and 7 million doses of H1N1 flu vaccine will arrive the first week of October, about double the previous estimate of 3.4 million doses, according to an Associated Press (AP) report today quoting Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Kathleen Sebelius. Most of the doses will be the nasal-spray vaccine, Sebelius said. Previous reports said the initial 3.4 million doses would all be the nasal-spray vaccine, which is approved only for healthy people aged 2 to 49 years.http://enews.earthlink.net/article/top?guid=20090924/4abafcd0_3421_1334520090924-794399662Sep 24 AP storyToronto group pens pandemic-ethics reportsThe University of Toronto Centre for Bioethics has nine articles covering ethical issues likely to arise in the second wave of the H1N1 flu pandemic. Topics include the duty of healthcare workers to work during a pandemic, limits on individual freedom, government responsibilities in vaccination programs, allocation of limited medical resources; and rich countries’ obligation to share resources with poor countries. The authors drew on academic and public opinion research.http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2009-09/uotj-mee092209.phpSep 23 EurekAlert press releaseHHS offers pandemic guidance for community, faith groupsHHS today released “H1N1 Flu: A Guide for Community and Faith-Based Organizations.” The guide describes how the leaders of organizations can help fight the pandemic by communicating health information effectively, supporting vaccination efforts, linking vulnerable and hard-to-reach populations to information and resources, and adjusting organizational activities to help people stay healthy.http://www.pandemicflu.gov/professional/community/cfboguidance.htmlHHS guide for community and faith-based organizationsAHRQ offers guide to mass medical care The HHS Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) today released a guide titled “Mass Medical Care with Scarce Resources: The Essentials,” which is an abbreviated version of a 2007 AHRQ publication. Topics covered are community-wide planning, ethical and legal considerations, prehospital, acute, and palliative care, and alternative care sites during public health emergencies. A special section on influenza pandemic preparedness is included.http://www.ahrq.gov/prep/mmcessentials/Hyperlinked table of contents and pdf documentCDC launches mobile texting toolA 3-month pilot text-messaging service has been launched by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to deliver important CDC information on H1N1 flu and other topics directly to users’ mobile phones. A subscription is required, but there is no cost. The CDC anticipates delivery of about three messages a week, and it is possible to opt out at any time. Feedback is sought during the pilot period.http://www.cdc.gov/mobile/CDC Web page with instructionsUS campus flu cases rise 15%Flu-like illnesses at the nation’s colleges rose by 15% from the previous week, according to a surveillance report for the week ending Sep 18 from the American College Health Association (ACHA). The report was based on 7,696 cases at 243 schools. It doesn’t specify flu subtype, but federal officials have said 98% of all circulating strains are pandemic H1N1. The number of new infections was highest in New England and some western states, and the pace seemed to slow in some southern states.http://www.acha.org/ILI_LatestWeek.cfm/?date=092409Sep 24 ACHA surveillance reportTrial confirms CDC wariness about rapid flu testsA field trial at two schools at the start of the novel H1N1 outbreak showed that the rapid influenza A and B test worked well for confirming the new virus, but not for ruling it out, according to the latest issue of Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. The researchers compared the rapid test with real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay. The findings confirm recent CDC advice to be cautious about using negative rapid test results to guide treatment.http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5837a1.htmSep 25 MMWR reportlast_img read more

Istra Inspirit represents Istria and Croatia at the Scottish International Storytelling Festival in Edinburgh

first_imgOne of the best tourist stories in the world according to the UNWTO, Istra Inspirit has the great honor to present Istria and Croatia at Scottish International Storytelling festival in Edinburgh.Thus, Istra Inspirit, as the only cultural and innovative tourism project from Croatia, was invited to present itself to the audience of the Scottish International Storytelling Festival in Edinburgh, which is being held for the 28th year in a row from October 20 to 31, 2017. those eager for creative presentations of stories from all over the world and thus connecting cultures, languages, generations and places, and this interesting concept that encourages cultural diversity will include Istra Inspirit, which will present Istria and Croatia on Tuesday, 24.10.During its performance in Edinburgh, Istra Inspirit will present Istrian stories, myths and legends from its rich creative palette of experiences, and in addition to stories characteristic of Istria, it will also present the most interesting legends from Croatia. Petra B. Blašković and Frano Novljan, academic actors with many years of experience in performing Istra Inspirit experiences, will perform on behalf of Istra Inspirit. “The promotion of Istra Inspirit on the foreign market is extremely important for the project which for the sixth year in a row successfully revives the history, myths and legends of the Istrian peninsula in authentic locations and behind which is an extremely fruitful season with over 100 performances realized in cooperation with public and private sector. stand out from Istra Inspirita.This trip will provide Istra Inspirit with connections with experts who also apply storytelling as a concept in their business and will provide them with education based on examples of good practice from abroad as well as connections with foreign stakeholders in culture and creative tourism.And don’t forget, tourism is made up of emotions, experiences and stories. Tell stories, our authentic stories.Related news:UNWTO MAKES ISTRIA INSPIRIT AMONG THE BEST TOURIST STORIES IN THE WORLD STORYTELLING IN THE TRUE SENSE – ISTRIA INSPIRITlast_img read more